Building trust in the heart of community

Inspiring a vision of community where a commitment to reconciliation and justice transcends competing identities and interests

For over two decades Hope in the Cities has helped transform Richmond, VA, from a symbol of racial division to a model for reconciliation. Through acknowledgement of history, honest conversation and skills building workshops, the experiential learning offered by Hope in the Cities builds capacity for community leaders.

A sustained citizen-led effort has resulted in a network of leaders in non-profit and business sectors, local government, media and education. It engages people across the political spectrum and of all cultural and religious backgrounds.

A proven process for change

Hope in the Cities' approach includes three vital steps:

Hope in the Cities offers Richmond as a center for community trustbuilding where processes for trustbuilding, reconciliation, and community change are regularly learned and effectively practiced.

Workshops & training

Hope in the Cities offers workshops on dialogue facilitation and design, acknowledgment of painful history, trustbuilding, and building and sustaining diverse teams in communities divided by race, ethnicity, class, or religion.

Workshops and trainings are custom-designed as a half-day, whole-day, or multi-modular sessions for community groups, nonprofit organizations, corporations, universities, faith congregations, social service and government agencies.

Workshops/trainings are offered in Richmond or on-site as requested.

Clients include:

Bon Secours Health System, Leadership Metro Richmond, Higher Achievement, Richmond Public Schools, Episcopal Diocese of Virginia, American Civil War Center, Neighborhood Resource Center, John Hope Franklin Center for Reconciliation, Tulsa, Justice Institute of British Columbia, Dayton Dialogue on Race Relations, Fetzer Institute, W.K. Kellogg Foundation, Annie E. Casey Foundation, Duke Divinity School, American University, University of Richmond, Norfolk State University, University of Virginia , Eastern Mennonite University

Find out more about workshops on offer...


News

Tuesday, April 25, 2017
Watch love work

Alison Wetter (CTF 2015) from Memphis, Tennessee, is part of a team that has launched a project called "Watch Love Work" to mark the 50th anniversary of the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. in their city in 1968. They are releasing a video story of love from Memphis every week this year.

Wednesday, March 22, 2017
2017 Community Trustbuilding Fellowship

“This experience has been truly one of a kind,” says Franklin Jennings who works with youth development. “What I find most impactful is that although tons of people in the world want to see good change happen, not many are equipping themselves to do anything about it.”

Tuesday, March 21, 2017
Alvin Herring Forum at UR

“We in this country are at a cultural and maybe moral crossroads," says Rev. Alvin Herring, director of racial equity and community engagement at the W.K. Kellogg Foundation. “We must speak truth, hold ourselves accountable, lament, and offer and accept forgiveness.”

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